Sleeping Pills and 5 Things to Know Before Taking Them | LowestMed

We all need sleep, but it’s getting harder to come by these days. Longer workdays are leading to stressful over-packed schedules, resulting in more coffee, yawns and less sleep. We are in such desperate need to find our ZZZs, we are willing to try every solution from new mattresses and pillows, white-noise machines, sleeping pills and even sleep coaches.

We aren’t here to solve the debate about which possible solution is the most effective or tell you which one is right for you, but if you’re thinking about trying sleeping pills, we’ve got a list of five essential things you should know beforehand. Try and stay awake!

5 Things You Should Know About Taking Sleeping Pills

1. You Aren’t Alone

Sleeping pills help with stress, traveling or any other disruptions (the yappy dog next door) that keep people awake. A recent study by the U.S. Centers of Disease and Prevention found that 34.8 percent of American adults are getting less than the recommended seven hours of sleep. Seven hours is the minimum amount of sleep that adults need to reduce the risk of obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke, mental distress, coronary heart disease and early death. Americans spent an estimated $41 billion on sleep aids and remedies in 2015, and that’s expected to grow to $52 billion by 2020, according to Natana Raj, an analyst with BCC Research in Wellesley, Mass.

2. How Sleeping Pills Work

Yeah, we know it makes you fall asleep, but how? Most sleeping pills fall into the category of sedative-hypnotics and work by dealing with neurotransmitters in the brain. Neurotransmitters are chemicals, made and released by nerves, that attach to receptors on other nerves and serve as a means of communication between nerves. Sleeping pills will generally increase the activity of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a neurotransmitter that, when increased in brain, produces drowsiness and facilitates and maintains sleep.

3. Potential Risks and Benefits

Prescription sleeping pills are designed to help you fall asleep easier or stay asleep longer, sometimes both. The potential risks and benefits associated with the various types of prescription sleeping pills can differ. Consult the chart below from the Mayo Clinic for a better understanding about potential risks and benefits.

Comparison of Sleeping Pills

(potential risks and benefits)

Temazepam (Restoril)

Helps you fall asleep

Helps you stay asleep

Can lead to dependence

Doxepin (silenor)

Helps you stay asleep

Zolpidem (Ambien, Edluar, Intermezzo, Zolpimist)

Helps you fall asleep

Can lead to dependence

Triazolam (Halcion)

Helps you fall asleep

Can lead to dependence

Estazolam

Helps you falls asleep

Helps you stay asleep

Can lead to dependence

Zaleplon (Sonata)

Helps you fall asleep

Can lead to dependence

Zolpidem extended release (Ambien CR)

Helps you fall asleep

Helps you stay asleep

Can lead to dependence

Eszopiclone (Lunesta)

Helps you falls asleep

Helps you say asleep

Can lead to dependence

4. Safety Guidelines

When taking sleeping pills, remember to keep these ten safety guidelines in mind:

1. Never mix sleeping pills with alcohol or other sedative drugs
2. Only take a sleeping pill when you have enough time for at least 7 to 8 hours of sleep
3. Never take a sleeping pill until you’re going to bed
4. Don’t take a second dose in the middle of the night
5. Start with the lowest recommended dose
6. Avoid frequent use
7. Never drive a car or operate machinery after taking a sleep med
8. Carefully read the package insert that comes with your medication
9. Quit carefully, some sleeping pills need to be stopped gradually
10. If the sleeping pills you plan to take are prescription, you should always consult with your physician to determine the best option and strategy for you

5. The Medications Don’t Have to Be Expensive

Medication costs add up fast, but prescription discount services, like LowestMed, help keep your medication affordable. These services offer discount coupons for medications and allow you to search various pharmacies so you can find your medication at the lowest cost. For example, when using LowestMed the average cost of a common prescription of Zolpidem, Ambien’s generic version, was $479 less than the same prescription of Ambien. Yeah we think it’s unbelievable too, so visit LowestMed to compare prescription drug prices and never overpay for medication again.

Try Searching the LowestMed Price for your Drug!

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